Thursday, August 13, 2020

Perseids, Planets and Milky Way at Mineola Nature Preserve.

While chasing Perseid Meteors at the Mineola Nature Preserve, during breaks I photographed other objects.

 Jupiter (RT) and Saturn near Sagittarius-to the right (note the Tea Pot asterism in the center) and a "crawling" Scorpius (to right) as opposed to the "standing" position it is in early evening.
Milky Way to left of Sagittarius (Looking at the galaxy's center where a massive Black Hole exists.
 A rising Mars (moderate magnification).
A Waning Crescent Moon.    
And at last is a Perseid below Cassiopeia (M on it's side.).

Saturday, July 25, 2020

COMET NEOWISE BECOMES OBLITERATED BY THE WAXING MOON / LAST LOOK AT THE NUCLEUS

As the Moon waxes in brightness, it obliterated the tail of Comet Neowise and the Comet fades into darkness. The first image in a mid-angle view of the comet below the Big Dipper asterism in the constellation URSA MAJOR. The nucleus in at the bottom of the frame and the tail toward the top away from the the Sun. The second image is at a higher focal length for a close up view.

Friday, July 24, 2020

COMET NEOWISE PHOTOGRAPH IN THE "TRIPLE PLAY"

Lisa Moss of Hawkins captured the Comet NEOWISE, recently, along with the aster-ism Big Dipper in the constellation URSA MAJOR and a meteor in the same shot. The Little Dipper with Polaris on the end, can be seen in the upper right above the meteor.

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

NEW NAKED EYE COMET VISIBLE NOW

Comet Neowise is a naked eye visible comet that can be seen in the NW sky at near Sundown through about the 23rd of this month. It is between LEO and URSA MAJOR (Big Dipper Asterism). See diagram below. For more information see the following source: https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/comet-neowise-dazzles-at-dusk/This is one of those unusual comets that are close and bright to see without a telescope. It is great with binoculars.

Monday, July 6, 2020

This the July 4th Penumbral Lunar Eclipse Moon. It is a little darker than a normal Full Moon because it is the outer part of the Earth's shadow. It is a little yellowish due in part to the dispersion of the Sun's light by the atmosphere, but more probably due to the Sahara Desert dust suspended in the atmosphere over Texas. We were lucky to see the Moon because of the forecasted scattered showers for the area. The photo was made at my home by Miranda Bennett of Tyler, TX. Also earlier in the month of June, she photographed the Strawberry Moon pictured below.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

We at ASET enjoy what we do and really enjoy sharing with others. We are thankful for the "Thank You"s we get when sharing the night sky. It's great to hear a "Thank You". Occasionally we get an email one. BUT Earlier this year we did a telescope viewing for the elementary kids at Chapel Hill's Wise Elementary School. I would like to share their "Thank You"s with others because they were different.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Astronomical Society of East Texas Stance Per Corvid-19

The Society has suspended all meetings and activities in respect to National, State and Local safety declarations concerning the spread of Corvid-19. In the interim, we will entertain questions and communications via our email: info@asetexas.com and our facebook page:Astronomical Society of East Texas.